Winchester Writers’ Festival 2017 – Agent One-to-Ones – Part Two

In my earlier blog which you can read below I spoke about the lead up to the Winchester Writers’ Festival one-to-ones. Each meeting was fifteen minutes long. Fifteen. Positively ages if you are waiting for something, gone in the blink of an eye if you are enjoying something. It’s a funny old thing, time.

The one-to-ones on the first day were held for some reason only known to the organisers in a large, windowless room. At least I think it was windowless, perhaps very heavy drapes were pulled. It was so gloomy in there it was depressing. It reminded me of battery farming. I truly pitied the poor agents who had to sit in there for hours on end. I think I would have gone out of my mind. What a perfectly awful and depressing setting. I’m guessing the person or committee who chose it didn’t have to sit in it.

Dark room
Room with chairs by Glasseyes View courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons licensed by CC BY-SA 2.0 – Winchester wasn’t quite as bad as this but you get the idea https://flic.kr/p/nShyGq https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

The one-to-ones on the second day were held in a different building, the waiting area was large and airy, the room we met in had windows (yay!) and whether it was my imagination or just the cohort of agents who attended that day, the atmosphere seemed lighter, happier and more energised.

I was struck, once more, by how young most of these women were – and they were predominantly women. Terrifyingly glam with faultless make-up, great hair, classy clothes and fabulous shoes, I couldn’t help wonder if somewhere in the country is an agent school, like an old fashioned finishing school, where they go to ‘get the look’. I was also struck, in a far less positive way, by the dearth of ethnicity.

Having met many editors at trad publishers I know this demographic is mirrored there too. This article is not about to turn into a rant about gatekeepers but when the people in charge of directing a large chunk of the industry are all cut from similar cloth is it any wonder that we have so many books that look and read the same, cookie cutter style? Heyho, a topic for another blog methinks.

Cookie cutter
Escher Cookie Cutters – The Sequel by Fdecomite courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons licensed by CC BY 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/kchCPr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Tales of meetings were swapped amongst the writers in corridors and classrooms, in the loos and at breakfast, lunch and dinner, like war stories. Those who had done well were congratulated, those who had faired less positively were consoled. Comments were picked over, endlessly analysed and debated. Facial expressions dissected and bad experiences, even if collected third or fourth hand, were recounted and passed along.

I heard examples of unprofessional conduct from some agents ranging from bored expressions and lack of interest to monosyllabic conversation and general apathy.

In fairness, it was hot in that soul-destroying room on the first day but still if you have put yourself up to take part and meet with however many wannabes you should be prepared to at least be professional and put your game face on even if you are bored to tears by most of them. Remember a lot of miles had been travelled and a lot of money spent to sit there in front of them. Boundless enthusiasm throughout the day would have been impossible for anyone, common courtesy should not have been.

One particularly mindboggling comment delivered to a friend of mine was ‘You cannot write about something you haven’t personally experienced’. What?! I have three murders in my current work in progress.

Question mark2
Business Way by Sebastian Vital courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons licensed by CC BY 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/Wo4mSw https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

How did I get on? I won’t name the agents I met with but the two on the first day were wonderfully friendly, warm and engaging on a personal level and complimentary about my work. Ultimately, neither were interested in taking things forward and that was cool. So much of writing is subjective. Our conversations were polite but a little stilted and finished before their allotted time.

Stand out comments for me were ‘What are you even doing here?’, ‘You should keep doing what you are doing, you’ll make more money indie publishing’ and ‘How does someone so glamorous write something so dark?’. I was heartened by the candour of the first and the kindness of the second (remember it was dark in that room!).

On the second day, in a far more suitable room, I met with two more agents. The first had clearly engaged with my writing style, fired questions at me ten to the dozen and our conversation zipped along with no awkward silences to the extent that we started nudging into the next meeting. A business card was handed over, a request to see the whole manuscript delivered. I left feeling energised from the encounter.

The second meeting was, unbelievably, even more positive. This particular agent had also clearly read the work I had submitted in forensic detail, her conversation was littered with the names of my characters and various plot points. On the desk in front of her, my covering letter was covered in handwritten comments, arrows, lines, stars and double underlining. Normally an expert at reading upside down I sadly could not decipher the unfamiliar handwriting. This conversation, too, went beyond its allotted time. It felt as though I was chatting with an old friend. How strange when we had only just met and in such artificial circumstances. A second business card was produced, another exhortation to send the whole manuscript when I had finished my edits.

Perhaps it is possible to find an agent at the writing equivalent of speed dating. I’ll let you know how it goes.

white lies
White Lies by Ellie Holmes http://Author.to/EllieHolmes
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5 thoughts on “Winchester Writers’ Festival 2017 – Agent One-to-Ones – Part Two

  1. deborahanndykeman 17/08/2017 / 3:47 pm

    I am happy to hear that you have not experienced murder! What great news! Thank you for the great descriptions of the agents, rooms, and environment. It was almost like we were there that first day…and wanted to run! Congratulations on the great interviews!

    Like

    • ellieholmesauthor 17/08/2017 / 5:30 pm

      Thanks Deborah. Yes whoever thought the room on day one was a good idea definitely needs to be made to sit in it for a day as penance! Ellie x

      Liked by 1 person

      • deborahanndykeman 18/08/2017 / 1:08 pm

        Maybe there was an intimidation factor going on there! lol

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      • ellieholmesauthor 19/08/2017 / 6:03 am

        Possibly but if I’d been on the other side of the desk I would have hated to spend a day like that. PS I love your blog. Ellie x

        Liked by 1 person

  2. K E Garland 19/08/2017 / 5:44 pm

    Congratulations Ellie! I hope it works out the way that you desire. I also look forward to your future post about the lack of diverse authors 😉

    Like

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