The Writer’s Waiting Game – Part Two

Waiting to discover the outcome of a submission to either an agent or a publisher is a nail biting time for all authors as I blogged about previously. This week my blog isn’t about the wait imposed upon you by others, it’s the wait you must impose upon yourself. This particularly applies to indie published authors and is by far the hardest wait of them all.

Too often writers succumb to a mad dash for publication. All that matters is getting the book out into the market place. It is as though the temptation becomes too much. But at what cost?

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Depending on how they are working indie authors have no one to tell them whether a manuscript is ready. If you don’t have a critique group to fall back on trusting your own judgment can be a difficult thing.

Once the drafting and polishing are finished, I can understand the urge to put your work out there but too many indie authors are slapdash about editing. They make the mistake of thinking they know enough themselves to be both writer and editor or that asking a well read friend to read the manuscript will suffice.

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Reading by Sebastien Wiertz courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons licensed by CC BY 2.0

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Some don’t see the point in wasting time in organising a proofread much less a professional one. There is a cost to hiring professionals but in the long run it is worth it. I hired both an editor and a proofreader. I also read the manuscript through several times during the process. I was amazed that the proofreader found errors (fortunately only a few) which the editor and I had missed. She also picked up a couple of niggles that had crept in during formatting.

Taking the time to get the book edited and proofread was, for me, worth it. I wouldn’t consider publishing a novel any other way. It’s an author’s shop window. Would you really want a half baked story full of spelling or grammatical errors on sale with your name on it? To do so risks losing fans who, with a bit more patience, you may have wowed with your fabulous book.

Publishing can be a crazy carousel ride but rush to publication too soon and everything you hoped to achieve will be undone at the outset.

Ignore the voice saying ‘Publish me. Publish me now!’ The extra time and effort you put in at this stage will reap rewards.

Indie authors are in the envious position amongst writers of having so much choice but don’t make the mistake of rushing things when there is absolutely no need. Put the extra time in and play the waiting game. I promise you, you will be pleased you did.

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Clock by Clive Darra courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons licensed by CC BY-SA 2.0

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7 thoughts on “The Writer’s Waiting Game – Part Two

  1. Jax Burrows 08/09/2016 / 9:00 am

    Good article. I am in that position at present. I have 2 books I am getting ready for publication and am eager to see them on Amazon. But I am determined to make them the best I can first. Its frustrating but necessary. Also, trying to learn all I can about marketing.There’s so much! When is your next book launching?

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    • ellieholmesauthor 08/09/2016 / 5:34 pm

      It’s a steep learning curve and there always seems to be more to learn but keep at it because it will pay off. I’ve just released The Tregelian Hoard which is a novella and the first in a three book set – a much simpler, gentle read compared to The Flower Seller. My next main novel will be out in June next year. Even when you’ve been through the process a couple of times there is still lots to learn. Do let me know when you publish. Ellie x

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  2. Niels Saunders 08/09/2016 / 10:50 am

    Great blog!

    I found the waiting game after submitting to literary agents to be extremely painful.

    It’s something I’m delighted to have left behind now I’ve entered the world of self-publishing.

    You’re right that writers often hurry to publication. A book should always be as good as it possibly can be before released.

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    • ellieholmesauthor 08/09/2016 / 5:27 pm

      No longer being in that demoralising submission loop is such a good feeling. Good luck with your self publishing. I hope it goes well for you. Ellie x

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Kelee Morris 08/09/2016 / 3:07 pm

    I completely agree. Publishing a book always takes much longer than I imagine it will. It’s hard to wait, but it’s worth it.

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    • ellieholmesauthor 08/09/2016 / 5:25 pm

      Patience is the key but that can be so difficult to maintain. Good luck with the wait 🙂

      Like

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